Video: Performance in Organizations: Part 2 in our 4 part series on Performance Improvement – July 16, 2020

In this second video of our four-part Performance Improvement (PI) series moderated by Kristen Kosinski, Klaus Wittkuhn and Roger Addison focus on How to Engineer Performance in Any Context: Performance of Organizations and Performance in Organizations. We started the session by addressing questions from last week and then did a short presentation on how performance is embedded systems and how the bigger system defines performance of the nested system.

Key examples were on student performance, teacher performance, school performance, and the performance of the whole education system. To learn more, please watch the video below, and add your comments and questions.

This video is from Agrilinks – which is part of the U.S. Government’s Feed the Future initiative that addresses the root causes of hunger, poverty and undernutrition, and establishes a lasting foundation for change.

The USAID Bureau for Resilience and Food Security (RFS) leads the Feed the Future initiative and supports Agrilinks through the Feed the Future Knowledge, Data, Learning, and Training (KDLT) program, implemented by Bixal and its sub-contractors, The QED Group, and Training Resources Group.

https://www.agrilinks.org/

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Video: How to Engineer Performance in Any Context: The Essentials July 9, 2020

In this first video of our four-part Performance Improvement (PI) series moderated by Kristen Kosinski, Klaus Wittkuhn and Roger Addison focus on the essentials and describe why training is often not the best solution for performance problems – and what one should look at instead. Moreover, they outline a systematic process of exploring performance issues, highlighting that everyone should be invited into the process.

To learn more, please watch the video below:

 

This video is from Agrilinks – which is part of the U.S. Government’s Feed the Future initiative that addresses the root causes of hunger, poverty and undernutrition, and establishes a lasting foundation for change.

The USAID Bureau for Resilience and Food Security (RFS) leads the Feed the Future initiative and supports Agrilinks through the Feed the Future Knowledge, Data, Learning, and Training (KDLT) program, implemented by Bixal and its sub-contractors, The QED Group, and Training Resources Group.

https://www.agrilinks.org/

https://www.agrilinks.org/post/changing-mental-models-change-world

If you look at program evaluations, the experience across projects, regions, and even countries, a pattern emerges. There is tremendous investment in training individuals and the results of these investments mostly fall short of delivering the desired results. This is not an issue unique to food and agricultural systems; this pattern appears across all development work, independent of sector, donor, implementer, or problem faced. Seeing the pattern, however, does not mean that development work is not productive. If we look at how many people came out of poverty and improved their lives, we certainly see enormous achievements. Still, there is always room for improvement and we hope that the ideas we will discuss every Thursday during the upcoming month can contribute to make this difficult work even more successful and rewarding.

Through this video series, we are going to talk about performance improvement, which in USAID terminology is called Local Capacity Development, which builds on and expands the former concept of Human and Institutional Capacity Development. Now you might ask, “How do I improve performance if not by training people and building their capacity to do better in their jobs?” This question is at the very core of the issue. The way you frame the problem immediately frames what is possible as a solution. Let’s look at a seemingly trivial example that illustrates the point in question perfectly. If you frame the problem as “we need better drivers”, the solution will be to train existing drivers or to hire different ones in the future. If you frame the problem as “we want to get products to market faster”, better drivers might be part of the solution or might not. In any case, they will not be THE solution. There are many factors influencing how fast products can get to a market, only one of them being the capabilities of the drivers. Equip a good driver with a car with flat tires and the driving skills of the driver will not play much of a role anymore.

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HPT Video Weekend Matinee: Svenson 2009

The HPT Video Weekend Matinee series is intended to introduce you to the library, with over 100 videos, in the hopes that you’ll share them further into your professional networks, as you see appropriate. And if you have videos to share with us, please forward them to the site administrators.

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A TOOLS FACEOFF! GOOGLE SLIDES VS MICROSOFT POWERPOINT-WHICH IS BEST FOR CLOSED CAPTIONING?

Did you know that Microsoft Powerpoint and Google Slides do live closed captioning during presentations? Last year was the first time I used the feature in a presentation and I’ve been hooked on using it ever since. Why?

  1. I talk fast sometimes.
  2. My southern accent comes out on certain words (pen, roof, pain). My husband’s favorite words to hear me say are “hill” and “ten”.
  3. Often times people may not be able to hear and miss out on key points.
  4. It’s helpful for English language learners to see subtitles.
  5. It can provide a more accessible experience for attendees
  6. It can provide a way for folks on a webinar to watch without audio.
  7. I think it makes me a better presenter as I’m not as likely to say silly things or sailor words while I have closed captioning on.

There are other benefits as well but those are some of the reasons I like to use it. I’ll never forget the magic of the first time I used this technique. Attendees wanted to know how I was doing the live closed captioning so, of course, I shared how I use Google Slides.

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See the rest of Cara’s post – here

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If You Are New to ID/LXD

Let Me Introduce You To: Nyla Spooner

I just happen to have come across Nyla 2 days ago, and her podcast series for people new to ID/LXD. She’s adding to her 10-20 minute series of podcasts every Monday.

That podcast series can be sourced here – and – here on her Website.

2020-08-05_8-49-06

Check out her website and connect her to people you know who might be somewhat new to ID/ISD/T&D/L&D/LXD … or whatever comes up next.

Nyla Spooner – Learning Experience Designer. Mentor. Advocate.

Nyla’s website: www.nylalxd.com

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Learning and Performance Improvement Professionals as First Responders

When organizations around the world shut down to defeat the spread of COVID-19, organizations turned to the teams who had the capacity to support remote workers and remote work. These professionals pivoted in many different ways to continue to support organizational performance. Some of the most visible activities included moving critical instructor-led training to virtual or on-demand formats, creating new learning and performance support to facilitate working remotely, and scaling the use of distance learning and communication technologies to new stakeholders and new situations.

The video below is a summary of a conversation I had about the role of instructional designers in response to COVID-19 and the opportunity that it now presents all of us as we move forward.[1]

Performance Improvement Professionals as First Responders

As this pivot to distance learning occurred, professionals in my network also noted many flawed approaches: slamming existing instruction into an online learning format without consideration of its relationship to performance, pushing information and content to employees in crisis, and failing to consider new or different performance needs as workflows changed.

Even before the crisis, one global study of executives showed that 87% were currently experiencing skill gaps or expecting to experience them in a few years, and less than half of respondents had a sense of how to address the problem. (McKinsey, 2020)

Performance improvement professionals, with the specific HPT skill set, can play a vital role in helping organizations define new workforce roles and activities, as well as the solution sets that will truly enable worthy performance as well as identify and close skill gaps. All professionals with learning and performance roles can revisit their analysis strategies to ensure that they provide the right solutions to the right audiences at the right time. (Snyder & Wisniewski, 2020)

This crisis is an opportunity to reframe our efforts and underscore their value to organizations. By aligning to new, as well as emerging needs, we can help our organizations meet business goals and achieve outcomes of value. If not now, when?


[1] The conversation is with Dr. Nadia Naffi, Professeure Adjointe, Titulaire de la Chaire de Leadership en Enseignement sur les Pratiques Pédagogiques Innovantes en Contexte Numérique – Banque Nationale, Département d’Etudes sur l’Enseignement et l’Apprentissage, Faculté des Sciences de l’Education , Université Laval.

Why I Don’t Believe in Empathic Design – Don Norman

May 8th, 2019

Human-centered design pioneer Don Norman, who coined the term ‘user experience,’ explains why he’s not convinced by the current obsession with empathy and what we should do instead.

I approve of the spirit behind the introduction of empathy into design, but I believe the concept is impossible, and even if possible, wrong. The reason we often talk about empathy in design is that we really need to understand the people that we’re working for. The idea is that, essentially, you’re in a person’s head and understand how they feel and what they think.

Don Norman Empathy in Design

In my opinion that’s impossible, and here’s why. If I’m designing a medical rehabilitation device for a unique person, I could argue it’s crucial to really understand their likes and dislikes, their personality and issues, and how they approach the world. But that’s relatively rare. Most of the time, in our field, we’re devising products and services that are being used by lots of people — hundreds, thousands, sometimes millions. In Facebook’s case it’s even billions. This means that understanding the individual person is actually not going to be very useful.

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For the rest of the article – please go here.

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HPT Video Weekend Matinee: Sink 2009

The HPT Video Weekend Matinee series is intended to introduce you to the library, with over 100 videos, in the hopes that you’ll share them further into your professional networks, as you see appropriate. And if you have videos to share with us, please forward them to the site administrators.

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TRUTH OR TRUTHINESS? ANALYSING A VR STUDY USING GORARD’S SIEVE

Mirjam Neelen & Paul A. Kirschner

It’s probably no news to anyone that we’re big on evidence-informed learning design (our whole blog is dedicated to it, mind you, and we published a book on the topic as well). One crucial part of evidence-informed practice is judging the veracity of information and/or research on how people learn or how one best can teach or train others, or which media/methods work and which don’t.

Asking ourselves whether certain information is truly truthful or only seems to be is not just nice to do, it’s a must. We need to be able to solidly/definitively differentiate between truth and it’s wicked stepsister ‘truthiness’[1] (see our blog here), a term coined by Stephen Colbert. Only if we’re able to determine which information we should dismiss and which we should trust, can we make well-informed decisions on how to design effective, efficient, and enjoyable learning experiences.

sieve

In this blog, we use Stephen Gorard’s sieve (2014) (see table 1) to try to determine if a study we ran across is trustworthy or not. The casus is a recent publication by PwC, in collaboration with Oculus for Business (a producer of Vitrtual Reality (VR) googles) and Talespin (a company that makes VR content), of a study titled ‘The Effectiveness of Virtual Reality Soft Skills Training in the Enterprise’.

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To read their blog post please go – here.

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